Ubuntu Hospital & Ubuntu Aeromedical & Ambulance Service

After much deliberation we decided not to ask for admitting privileges at St Emlyns (UK) or JANUS General (US) Imaginary Hospitals, but rather open an African virtual hospital.

We felt that the developing world has it’s own specific set of unique problems that can only be expressed adequately in an African environment! Problems including Sjambok injuries causing Crush Syndrome, PERC negative & Wells Score of zero not equating to no DVT/PE in the HIV/TB setting, Cape Cobras, Cable thieves buried underground for >24hours, commonplace >20 intercostal drains on a Saturday night at a primary healthcare clinic, ‘Tik‘, Anti-Retroviral & TB Medication Overdoses, Minimal access to PCI (and in some places no access to Thrombolytics), TB/HIV overwhelm units.

All practitioners across Africa are welcome to “admit” patients to our imaginary hospital or utilize our EMS services to transport patients. The Ubuntu group name is available to maintain patient confidentiality to allow discussions of patient cases for educational benefit. Basically there are minimal rules as it is an imaginary hospital/service!

They way it works is just email us your interesting case, or case in which you learnt something (can be a medical or non-medical learning point!) We will then look through it & help you to turn it into a badEM guest blog post – this can either be done anonymously or with your name attached.. Send to: info@badem.co.za & we can discuss further.

If you would like to know the origin of the name ‘Ubuntu’ that our hospital is named after please read more here.

Past cases seen at Ubuntu Hospital

Ubuntu #5: Muthi Mayhem

1920 1080 Victoria Stephen

The case: A 27 year old male is brought to the Ubuntu Hospital ED by EMS with a history of feeling unwell for two days. It is difficult to get further history from him, as he is extremely tachypnoeic and confused. His family relate to you that he has always been perfectly healthy until three…

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Ubuntu #4: The curious case of the ligamentum arteriosum

1063 1125 Jo Park-Ross

Author: Pierre Smit Original presenter: Dr John Roos Editor: Jo Park-Ross At approximately 07H00 Ubuntu Aeromedical Service received a call on their rotor-wing platform for a young gentleman who had fallen from a height of approximately 5 meters. They were told that the incident had occurred at 06H00, and that the patient was standing on…

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Ubuntu #3: The Michelin Man: The case of a ruptured bulla

992 757 Kat Evans

Ubuntu #3 The Michelin Man: The case of a ruptured bulla Author: Dr Kylen Swartzberg | Editor: Dr Kat Evans The Case: Presented in real time Friday Night, Ubuntu Emergency Department. 21:15 – 53 year old male patient rushed into triage in a wheelchair by his panic stricken wife. She shouts to the triage nurse…

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Ubuntu #2: Divination and a Diagnostic Dilemma

2058 1500 Kirsten Kingma

Ubuntu #2: Divination and a Diagnostic Dilemma Guest Author Victoria Stephen Edited by Kirsten Kingma   You are on duty at uBuntu Hospital Emergency Department on a Tuesday evening when a 37 year old male is brought in by EMS. His neighbour had called EMS when she had noticed that he had not ventured out of…

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Ubuntu #1: Not another tachypnoeic pregnant patient!

1470 827 Kat Evans

Ubuntu #1: Not another tachypnoeic pregnant patient! Guest Author: Dr Neville Vlok | Editor: Dr Katya Evans History Mrs V is a 35 year old G3P2 female at 32 weeks pregnant by dates. She was referred to Ubuntu hospital for IVI antibiotics after being seen at the local clinic with a diagnosis of “severe pneumonia”. Complaints:…

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Ubuntu Hospital – African Virtual Hospital, Aeromedical & Ambulance Service

1024 544 badEM

Ubuntu Hospital & Ubuntu Aeromedical & Ambulance Service After much deliberation we decided not to ask for admitting privileges at St Emlyns (UK) or JANUS General (US) Imaginary Hospitals, but rather open an African virtual hospital. We felt that the developing world has it’s own specific set of unique problems that can only be expressed…

read more